The Tax Advantages of Being a Landlord

The promise of ‘tax breaks’ for investing in real estate is one of the biggest draws, but what are they?

Minimizing taxes is often promoted as one of the top reasons to invest in real estate. Yet, few investors are aware of what those tax advantages are and how they can be maximized. That often leads to thousands of extra dollars being shelled out to the tax man each year. So what are the real breaks available?

Here are five ways to lower your taxes as a landlord, plus a couple of extra power strategies to investigate…

Depreciation

Depreciation is one of the biggest tax breaks for landlords. Properties and improvements degrade and become worn over time. You can get a tax credit for that. Under the new PATH Act some types of properties can enjoy accelerated depreciation, and their landlords get bigger breaks sooner. Note that this is one of the few deductions out there that mortgage lenders will allow you to add back to your qualifying income when applying for loans.

Financing Costs

Mortgage interest, lender points, and other financing fees may all potentially become tax deductions. That can be a big motivator and perk for using financial leverage to grow a portfolio faster and earlier.

Taxes, Taxes, Taxes

Yes, you can actually write off other types of taxes you pay in conjunction with investing in real estate when it comes time to file your taxes. You can also deduct what you pay in accounting and tax preparation fees. That’s a big reason to get the best tax prep help you can get.

Losses

Some real estate investors and business owners may experience net paper losses in the first couple of years. Those losses may be used to offset other earned household income. These essentially become credits against other income tax liability, and maybe rolled over to cover future year’s liability. Don’t overlook this one.

Property Management

It’s sad to see so many real estate investors running themselves ragged, taking on extra liability, and hurting their net profits all because they think they are saving by not using professional property management. Ironically those ‘costs’ can be a tax break too.

More Miscellaneous Expenses and Tax Breaks for Landlords

According to Landlordology and House Logic some of the other commonly neglected breaks for landlords include advertising expenses, payroll and commissions paid, property maintenance, insurance premiums, and legal fees.

Advanced Tax Strategies for Serious Real Estate Investors

While LLCs, SDIRAs, 1031 exchanges, and other asset protection tools can add another layer of tax write-offs and defense, and are frequently referred to as ‘advanced’, they should be utilized by far more investors. Don’t wait till you’ve got a big tax bill to try and fix the situation. These tools can open the doors to breaks for offices, vehicles, communications, education, and more, as well as shielding investors from taxes on gains so they can snowball and enjoy compounding results for decades.

Disclaimer: It is always crucial talk to your own individual licensed professionals for custom advice and to create a real tax strategy before making any financial moves.

Authored by Matthew C. Mullhofer, PC

Matt is a licensed California attorney specializing in asset protection, trusts, corporate law, succession planning, bankruptcy, real estate, and tax law. He has successfully represented clients to the highest levels of the justice system in fighting to protect them, and their finances. Matt has served as the Ethics Chairman for Le Tip International, The Chapter of Orange for 15 years, and is a member of the revered Wealth Counsel.

 

The Big Perks of Owning Real Estate in an LLC

LLC Benefits

What are the real advantages of owning real estate in a limited liability company? What common blunders could cost investors big time?

Bizadvisor.com proclaims “the limited liability is the top choice for real property.” A review of recorded real estate transactions from Property Shark by the wealthiest and most sophisticated investors and funds in hot Manhattan over the last year show LLCs almost exclusively used for taking ownership. So why are these legal structures and investment vehicles so popular with savvy investors? What are the real pros and cons?

The Advantages of Investing in Real Estate with an LLC

The most popular benefits of using LLCs in real estate investing include…

Privacy

The security conscious and those desiring anonymity from frivolous and malicious lawsuits prize vehicles like these as an extra layer of privacy.

Limited Liability

Chief Strategist of Breakwater Equity Partners, Jack Rose, says “One major advantage of an LLC over a partnership is that the liability of the members of an LLC can be limited to their financial investment,” and “so if the worst happens, the most the owners can lose are the assets being held by the LLC.”

Lack of Double Taxation

Limited liability companies offer lack of double taxation which can be a big issue that takes a large bite out of revenues and returns when using other entities.

Flexibility

LLCs can provide members and investors far more flexibility in operations and structure than some other types of legal entity.

Reduced Paperwork and Time Burden

Some legal structures require regular board meetings and the recording of minutes. Burdens like these can expose investors to risk if they fail to stay on top of them. Or may eat away at time and resources if they do.

3 LLC Pitfalls to Watch Out for

1. Filing Reports

Original applications and annual renewal fees must be kept up with in order to enjoy seamless operations and ongoing coverage. In some states an LLC can be filed online, in 5 minutes or less, for just around $100. However, with anything this important it is crucial to obtain professional legal advice, personalized advice on your unique individual circumstances, and ensure paperwork is completed and filed flawlessly.

2. Timing

One of the most significant mistakes real estate investors make is putting off registering a LLC until late in the game. Transferring an owned property to an LLC or especially an IRA LLC can potentially trigger substantial tax consequences.

3. Piercing the Corporate Veil

As with any corporate structure it is vital for investors to avoid any activities which could allow for exposure to piercing the corporate veil. Activities such as comingling funds could result in the failure of the LLC to maintain its protections in court.

Summary

LLCs have many advantages. Used well they can be invaluable. Used poorly they can increase liability. Consult a professional and find out if a LLC is right for you and your strategy, and look out for the June 2016 presentation on Asset Protection at the top ranked West Coast real estate investors club 12 Rounds.

Authored by Titanium Asset Protection

Titanium Asset Protection is an elite asset protection firm with licensed California attorneys on staff who specialize in asset protection, trusts, corporate law, succession planning, bankruptcy, real estate, and tax law. Our team has successfully represented clients to the highest levels of the justice system in fighting to protect them, and their finances, with lead counsel Matt serving as the Ethics Chairman for Le Tip International, The Chapter of Orange for 15 years, being an honored member of the revered Wealth Counsel.

How Much of Your Estate Will Be Left Out of Your Will?

How Much of Your Estate Will Be Left Out of Your Will? (It’s Probably More Than You Think)

You’ve hired an attorney to draft your will, inventoried all of your assets, and have given copies of important documents to your loved ones. But your estate planning shouldn’t stop there. Regardless of how well your will is drafted, if you do not take certain steps regarding your non-probate assets, you run the risk of unintentionally disinheriting your chosen beneficiaries from a significant portion of your estate.

A will has no effect on the distribution of certain types of property after your death. Such assets, known as “non-probate” assets are typically transferred upon your death either as a beneficiary designation or automatically, by operation of law.

For example, if your 401(k) plan indicates your spouse as a designated beneficiary, he or she automatically inherits the account upon you passing.  In fact, by law, your spouse is entitled to inherit the funds in your 401(k) account.  If you wish to leave your 401(k) retirement account to someone other than a surviving spouse, you must obtain a signed waiver from your spouse indicating her agreement to waive her rights to the assets in that account.

Other types of retirement accounts also transfer to your beneficiaries outside of a probate proceeding, and therefore are not subject to the provisions of your will.  An Individual Retirement Account (IRA) does not automatically transfer to your spouse by operation of law as is the case with 401(k) plans, so you  must complete the IRA’s beneficiary designation form, naming the heirs you want to inherit the account upon your death. Your will has no effect on who inherits your IRA; the beneficiary designation on file with the financial institution controls who will receive your property.

Similarly, you must name a beneficiary on your life insurance policy. Upon your death, the insurance proceeds are not subject to the terms of a will and will be paid directly to your named beneficiary.

Probate avoidance is a noble goal, saving your loved ones both time and money as they close your estate. In addition to the assets listed above, which must be handled through beneficiary designations, there are other types of assets that may be disposed of using a similar procedure.   These include assets such as bank accounts and brokerage accounts, including stocks and bonds, in which you have named a pay-on-death (POD) or transfer-on-death (TOD) beneficiary; upon your passing, the asset will be transferred directly to the named beneficiary, regardless of what provisions are in your will. Depending on the state, vehicles may also be titled with a TOD beneficiary.

To make these arrangements, submit a beneficiary designation form to the applicable financial institution or motor vehicle department. Be sure to keep the beneficiary designations current, and provide instructions to your executor listing which assets are to be transferred in this manner.  Most such designations also allow for listing of alternate beneficiaries in case they predecease you.

Another common non-probate asset is real estate that is co-owned with someone else where the deed has a survivorship provision in it.  For example, many deeds to real property owned by married couples are owned jointly by both husband and wife, with right of survivorship.  Upon the passing of either spouse, the interest of the passing spouse immediately passes to the surviving spouse by operation of law, irrespective of any conflicting instructions in your will.  Keep in mind that you need not be married for such a provision to be in effect; joint ownership of real property with right of survivorship can exist among any group of co-owners.  If you want your will to be controlling with regard to disposition of such property, you need to have a new deed prepared (and recorded) that does not have a right of survivorship provision among the co-owners.

You’ve spent a lifetime of hard work to accumulate your assets and it’s important that you take all necessary steps to ensure that your wishes regarding who will get your assets will be honored as you intend. Carve a few hours out of your busy schedule, several times a year, to review all of your deeds and beneficiary designations to make certain that they remain consistent with your objectives.

 

 

What’s Involved in Serving as an Executor?

What’s Involved in Serving as an Executor?

An executor is the person designated in a Will as the individual who is responsible for performing a number of tasks necessary to wind down the decedent’s affairs. Generally, the executor’s responsibilities involve taking charge of the deceased person’s assets, notifying beneficiaries and creditors, paying the estate’s debts and distributing the property to the beneficiaries. The executor may also be a beneficiary of the Will, though he or she must treat all beneficiaries fairly and in accordance with the provisions of the Will.

First and foremost, an executor must obtain the original, signed Will as well as other important documents such as certified copies of the Death Certificate.  The executor must notify all persons who have an interest in the estate or who are named as beneficiaries in the Will. A list of all assets must be compiled, including value at the date of death. The executor must take steps to secure all assets, whether by taking possession of them, or by obtaining adequate insurance. Assets of the estate include all real and personal property owned by the decedent; overlooked assets sometimes include stocks, bonds, pension funds, bank accounts, safety deposit boxes, annuity payments, holiday pay, and work-related life insurance or survivor benefits.

The executor is responsible for compiling a list of the decedent’s debts, as well. Debts can include credit card accounts, loan payments, mortgages, home utilities, tax arrears, alimony and outstanding leases. All of the decedent’s creditors must also be notified and given an opportunity to make a claim against the estate.

Whether the Will must be probated depends on a variety of factors, including size of the estate and how the decedent’s assets were titled. An experienced probate or estate planning attorney can help determine whether probate is required, and assist with carrying out the executor’s duties. If the estate must go through probate, the executor must file with the court to probate the Will and be appointed as the estate’s legal representative.  Once the executor has this legal authority, he or she must pay all of the decedent’s outstanding debts, provided there are sufficient assets in the estate. After debts have been paid, the executor must distribute the remaining real and personal property to the beneficiaries, in accordance with the wishes set forth in the Will. Because the executor is accountable to the beneficiaries of the estate, it is extremely important to keep complete, accurate records of all expenditures, correspondence, asset distribution, and filings with the court and government agencies.

The executor is also responsible for filing all tax returns for the deceased person including federal and state income tax returns and estate tax filings, if applicable. Additional tasks may include notifying carriers for homeowner’s and auto insurance policies and initiating claims on life insurance policies.

The executor is entitled to compensation for his or her services.  This fee varies according to the estate’s size and may be subject to review depending on the complexity as well as the time and effort expended by the executor.

Duties of an Executer

 

Duties of an Executer

executer

An executor’s fee is the amount charged by the person who has been appointed as the executor of the probate estate for handling all of the necessary steps in the probate administration. Therefore, if you have been appointed an executor of someone’s estate, you might be entitled to a fee for your services.  This fee could be based upon a variety of factors and some of those factors may be dependent upon state, or even local, law.

General Duties of an Executor

  •  Securing the decedent’s home (changing locks, etc.)
  •  Identifying and collecting all bank accounts, investment accounts, stocks, bonds and mutual funds
  •  Having all real estate appraised; having all tangible personal property appraised
  •  Paying all of the decedent’s debts and final expenses
  •  Making sure all income and estate tax returns are prepared, filed and any taxes paid
  •  Collecting all life insurance proceeds and retirement account assets
  •  Accounting for all actions; and making distributions of the estate to the beneficiaries or heirs.

This list is not all-inclusive and depending upon the particular estate more, or less, steps may be needed.

As you can see, there is a lot of work (and legal liability) involved in being the executor of an estate.  Typically the executor would keep track of his or her time and a reasonable hourly rate would be used. Other times, an executor could charge based upon some percent of the value of the estate assets. What an executor may charge, and how an executor can charge, may be governed by state law or even a local court’s rules. You also asked whether the deceased can make you agree not to take a fee. The decedent can put in his or her will that the executor should serve without compensation but the named executor is not obligated to take the job. He or she could simply decline to serve. If no one will serve without taking a fee, and if the decedents will states the executor must serve without a fee, a petition could be filed with the court asking them to approve a fee even if the will says otherwise. Notice should be given to all interested parties such as all beneficiaries.

If you have been appointed an executor or have any other probate or estate planning issues, contact us for a consultation today.